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Hong Kong’s eleventh straight weekend of antigovernment protests culminated in a large rally at the city’s Victoria Park on Aug. 18. Tens of thousands chanted “Free Hong Kong! Democracy Now!” and “Fight for freedom! Stand for Hong Kong!” as a heavy rain fell. Many at the #protest carried banners decrying alleged police brutality and what they claim is collusion between law enforcement and criminal gangs known as triads. There were no major street battles or arrests, to the considerable relief of many in the restive enclave. By the middle of Sunday afternoon, large numbers of protesters defied a police order and began streaming from #VictoriaPark towards the central business district. The sheer number of marchers overwhelmed major roads and brought parts of downtown #HongKong to a virtual standstill. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
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Hong Kong’s eleventh straight weekend of antigovernment protests culminated in a large rally at the city’s Victoria Park on Aug. 18. Tens of thousands chanted “Free Hong Kong! Democracy Now!” and “Fight for freedom! Stand for Hong Kong!” as a heavy rain fell. Many at the #protest carried banners decrying alleged police brutality and what they claim is collusion between law enforcement and criminal gangs known as triads. There were no major street battles or arrests, to the considerable relief of many in the restive enclave. By the middle of Sunday afternoon, large numbers of protesters defied a police order and began streaming from #victoriapark towards the central business district. The sheer number of marchers overwhelmed major roads and brought parts of downtown #HongKong to a virtual standstill. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME

Pigeon competitions and award-winning potatoes are just some of the highlights at the #Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18 in Des Moines. Not to mention all the Democratic presidential candidates, which are trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the Iowa caucus in February 2020. In these photographs: potatoes are displayed on Aug. 10; a boom mic is seen above the fray as @pete.buttigieg greets fair-goers on Aug. 13; an overflowing trash can; people look up as Buttigieg rides the Sky Glider; and Jett Thomas, 17, holds his 2.1-pound pigeon after judging in the Heaviest and Lightest Pigeon Contest on Aug. 12. (It's not his first win.) See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @mscottbrauer for TIME
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Pigeon competitions and award-winning potatoes are just some of the highlights at the #Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18 in Des Moines. Not to mention all the Democratic presidential candidates, which are trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the Iowa caucus in February 2020. In these photographs: potatoes are displayed on Aug. 10; a boom mic is seen above the fray as @pete.buttigieg greets fair-goers on Aug. 13; an overflowing trash can; people look up as Buttigieg rides the Sky Glider; and Jett Thomas, 17, holds his 2.1-pound pigeon after judging in the Heaviest and Lightest Pigeon Contest on Aug. 12. (It's not his first win.) See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @mscottbrauer for TIME

Ever since @LIFE magazine’s 20th anniversary commemorative edition revealed they were on the cover of Atlantic Records’ original 1970 Woodstock: Music from the Original Soundtrack and More, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline have been telling the story of how they met. It happened in February 1969 when Nick was a 20-year-old bartender at Dino’s, in Middletown, N.Y., and Bobbi, then 19, was dating a waiter there. That Memorial Day Weekend, when the waiter went to the Jersey Shore for a guys trip without telling Bobbi, Nick invited her to go to pizza and a movie. A few months later, they were at #Woodstock. Photographer Burk Uzzle has recalled walking around looking for a good shot and seeing the couple stand up and hug, kiss and smile at each other, before Bobbi leaned her head on Nick’s shoulder.
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Ever since @LIFE magazine’s 20th anniversary commemorative edition revealed they were on the cover of Atlantic Records’ original 1970 Woodstock: Music from the Original Soundtrack and More, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline have been telling the story of how they met. It happened in February 1969 when Nick was a 20-year-old bartender at Dino’s, in Middletown, N.Y., and Bobbi, then 19, was dating a waiter there. That Memorial Day Weekend, when the waiter went to the Jersey Shore for a guys trip without telling Bobbi, Nick invited her to go to pizza and a movie. A few months later, they were at #woodstock. Photographer Burk Uzzle has recalled walking around looking for a good shot and seeing the couple stand up and hug, kiss and smile at each other, before Bobbi leaned her head on Nick’s shoulder. "These beautiful people live on, decade after decade," he says now, "and while showing us their #love from within a muddy blanket, have created a legacy of hope for a better world." See more

For our new Asia cover story, photographer Adam Ferguson, a longtime TIME contributor, documented the unrest in #HongKong from its frontlines, capturing smoke-filled scenes of turmoil and moments of powerlessness as young #protesters find themselves outmatched by riot police. The crisis there is the most serious to rattle the former British colony since its return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. “The real issue is what comes next for Hong Kong, not the daily mayhem between police and protesters,” says Ferguson. “Tear gas and arrests have become a smoke screen for a larger conversation that needs to happen. Something has to give.” See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
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For our new Asia cover story, photographer Adam Ferguson, a longtime TIME contributor, documented the unrest in #HongKong from its frontlines, capturing smoke-filled scenes of turmoil and moments of powerlessness as young #protesters find themselves outmatched by riot police. The crisis there is the most serious to rattle the former British colony since its return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. “The real issue is what comes next for Hong Kong, not the daily mayhem between police and protesters,” says Ferguson. “Tear gas and arrests have become a smoke screen for a larger conversation that needs to happen. Something has to give.” See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME

It has been a long, volatile summer in #HongKong, where anti-government #protests are well into their third month with no clear end in sight. Stakes are ratcheted higher each week as police and protesters face off amid thick clouds of tear gas and flying debris. The movement against a bill that would have allowed the extradition of fugitives to the mainland awakened deeper anxieties about the city’s future under Beijing’s authoritarian rule, developing into a broader fight to defend the freedoms that distinguish Hong Kong from the rest of #China. In this photograph, an antigovernment protester is arrested near the Tsim Sha Tsui police station in Kowloon on Aug. 11. See more pictures at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
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It has been a long, volatile summer in #HongKong, where anti-government #protests are well into their third month with no clear end in sight. Stakes are ratcheted higher each week as police and protesters face off amid thick clouds of tear gas and flying debris. The movement against a bill that would have allowed the extradition of fugitives to the mainland awakened deeper anxieties about the city’s future under Beijing’s authoritarian rule, developing into a broader fight to defend the freedoms that distinguish Hong Kong from the rest of #China. In this photograph, an antigovernment protester is arrested near the Tsim Sha Tsui police station in Kowloon on Aug. 11. See more pictures at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME

When @lilnasx recorded “Old Town Road” last fall, he was hoping it could be his way out of an unhappy life. Born Montero Lamar Hill outside #Atlanta in 1999, Lil Nas grew up poor, living with one parent or another—his mother and father split when he was 6. As he spent most of his teenage years alone, he began to live on the Internet and particularly Twitter, creating #memes that showed his disarming wit and pop-culture savvy. “It was like, I’m able to go viral, but I’m not promoting anything that’s gonna help me,” he says. “Until music came along.” A gifted vocalist since he was a child—his father is a gospel singer—Lil Nas began writing and recording songs in his closet. When, around last Halloween, he stumbled across a banjo-driven beat by the teenage Dutch producer @youngkio, he saw an opportunity to combine trap—a Southern-born #hiphop subgenre propelled by vicious bass and crawling tempos—with #country, which was experiencing a surge of popularity on the Internet. “Because it’s two polar opposites coming together, it’s funny no matter what it is,” he says. For the history of #music, artists like Lil Nas were the exception, writes Andrew R. Chow. Now, by definition, Lil Nas is the rule. Read more at the link in bio. Video by @khomariflashfilms and @alexandra_robson for TIME
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When @lilnasx recorded “Old Town Road” last fall, he was hoping it could be his way out of an unhappy life. Born Montero Lamar Hill outside #Atlanta in 1999, Lil Nas grew up poor, living with one parent or another—his mother and father split when he was 6. As he spent most of his teenage years alone, he began to live on the Internet and particularly Twitter, creating #memes that showed his disarming wit and pop-culture savvy. “It was like, I’m able to go viral, but I’m not promoting anything that’s gonna help me,” he says. “Until music came along.” A gifted vocalist since he was a child—his father is a gospel singer—Lil Nas began writing and recording songs in his closet. When, around last Halloween, he stumbled across a banjo-driven beat by the teenage Dutch producer @youngkio, he saw an opportunity to combine trap—a Southern-born #hiphop subgenre propelled by vicious bass and crawling tempos—with #country, which was experiencing a surge of popularity on

When @lilnasx's debut single “Old Town Road” exploded online early this year and began climbing the charts, industry prognosticators anticipated a quick rise and fall. It’s now the longest-running No. 1 song in history, having occupied the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 for 19 weeks. It’s been streamed more than a billion times on @spotify alone. All of this has made “Old Town Road” the defining sound of the year, a slurry, genre-busting interpolation of two quintessential American musical genres: #country and hip-hop. Yet even from his perch, writes Andrew R. Chow, Lil Nas is still an outlier. There aren’t many black stars in country #music; there aren’t many queer stars in #hiphop. There aren’t many queer black stars in American culture, point-blank. The fact that Lil Nas has risen so far and so fast testifies not only to his skill, but also to the erosion of the systems that for generations kept #artists like him on the sidelines. At a time when debates about categorization and identity are ubiquitous, Lil Nas X represents a more unified vision of the future, one in which a young #queer black man can dominate popular #culture by being unapologetically himself. “Everything lined up for this moment to take me to this place,” he says now. “Not to sound self-centered, but it feels like I’m chosen, in a way, to do this stuff.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @kelianne for TIME; animation by @brobeldesign; “Old Town Road” (p) 2019 Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment
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When @lilnasx's debut single “Old Town Road” exploded online early this year and began climbing the charts, industry prognosticators anticipated a quick rise and fall. It’s now the longest-running No. 1 song in history, having occupied the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 for 19 weeks. It’s been streamed more than a billion times on @spotify alone. All of this has made “Old Town Road” the defining sound of the year, a slurry, genre-busting interpolation of two quintessential American musical genres: #country and hip-hop. Yet even from his perch, writes Andrew R. Chow, Lil Nas is still an outlier. There aren’t many black stars in country #music; there aren’t many queer stars in #hiphop. There aren’t many queer black stars in American culture, point-blank. The fact that Lil Nas has risen so far and so fast testifies not only to his skill, but also to the erosion of the systems that for generations kept #artists like him on the sidelines. At a time when debates about

TIME's new Asia cover: There is no longer any doubt that #HongKong is on a collision course with #China's government, which has ruled the former British colony since 1997. What began as an uprising against a single piece of legislation has spiraled into all-out rebellion against Beijing’s encroaching authoritarianism, and a demand for more #democracy. Peaceful processions have morphed into pitched battles on the dense residential streets. Chief Executive Carrie Lam and her largely pro-Beijing government have all but vanished, hiding behind columns of anonymous riot police and making occasional, highly scripted remarks to the press. The increasingly radical nature of the #protests has not, as authorities expected, diminished their popular support. But the demonstrators are nonetheless bracing for a lethal blow as the government’s patience wears thin. Long before the city streets became a battleground, writes Feliz Solomon, China had already begun waging a war for Hong Kong’s soul. Read the full story at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
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TIME's new Asia cover: There is no longer any doubt that #HongKong is on a collision course with #China's government, which has ruled the former British colony since 1997. What began as an uprising against a single piece of legislation has spiraled into all-out rebellion against Beijing’s encroaching authoritarianism, and a demand for more #democracy. Peaceful processions have morphed into pitched battles on the dense residential streets. Chief Executive Carrie Lam and her largely pro-Beijing government have all but vanished, hiding behind columns of anonymous riot police and making occasional, highly scripted remarks to the press. The increasingly radical nature of the #protests has not, as authorities expected, diminished their popular support. But the demonstrators are nonetheless bracing for a lethal blow as the government’s patience wears thin. Long before the city streets became a battleground, writes Feliz Solomon, China had already begun waging a war for Hong Kong’s

Corn kernels indicate votes in a poll at the Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18, in Des Moines. All 20 Democratic presidential candidates have landed, trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the #Iowa caucus in February 2020. @berniesanders enjoyed a corndog and visited the sculpted Butter Cow, while @elizabethwarren, whose appearance drew large and energetic crowds, gamely stood for pictures with fans. @corybooker had some deep-fried vegetables and took a spin on a ferris wheel, while @kamalaharris showed off her skills at the grill. Beyond sampling the food offerings, the candidates talked policy and exchanged ideas with local farmers. See more pictures of the fair’s liveliness and quiet moments, from a beard-judging contest to lounging cattle, at the link bio. Photograph by @mscottbrauer for TIME
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Corn kernels indicate votes in a poll at the Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18, in Des Moines. All 20 Democratic presidential candidates have landed, trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the #Iowa caucus in February 2020. @berniesanders enjoyed a corndog and visited the sculpted Butter Cow, while @elizabethwarren, whose appearance drew large and energetic crowds, gamely stood for pictures with fans. @corybooker had some deep-fried vegetables and took a spin on a ferris wheel, while @kamalaharris showed off her skills at the grill. Beyond sampling the food offerings, the candidates talked policy and exchanged ideas with local farmers. See more pictures of the fair’s liveliness and quiet moments, from a beard-judging contest to lounging cattle, at the link bio. Photograph by @mscottbrauer for TIME

The trunk of a tree burns after a wildfire near the village of Makrimalli on the Greek island of Evia, northeast of Athens, on Aug. 14. Hundreds of villagers were evacuated a day earlier and Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis cut a vacation short as scores of firefighters battled the major blaze on the country's second-largest island, authorities said. Fifty-six fires broke out across #Greece in a 24-hour period this week, @apnews reports. Photograph by @angelos_tzortzinis—@afpphoto/@gettyimages
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The trunk of a tree burns after a wildfire near the village of Makrimalli on the Greek island of Evia, northeast of Athens, on Aug. 14. Hundreds of villagers were evacuated a day earlier and Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis cut a vacation short as scores of firefighters battled the major blaze on the country's second-largest island, authorities said. Fifty-six fires broke out across #Greece in a 24-hour period this week, @apnews reports. Photograph by @angelos tzortzinis—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

On a cold morning in December 2015, when Walid Khalil Murad realized the smuggler’s boat had gone under off the coast of Greece with his family still trapped in the cabin, he tried to tug off the life jacket that kept him afloat as he drifted away. A friend shouted at him to stop. Murad, 34, who owned two shops in the Iraqi city of Sinjar before Islamic State fighters forced him to take his family and flee, has never seen three-year-old Nishtiman, her brothers Nashwan, 5, and Nashat, 6, or his wife Jinar again. “Sometimes I talk to myself—I literally talk to myself—and say ‘maybe, just maybe, they are still alive,'
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On a cold morning in December 2015, when Walid Khalil Murad realized the smuggler’s boat had gone under off the coast of Greece with his family still trapped in the cabin, he tried to tug off the life jacket that kept him afloat as he drifted away. A friend shouted at him to stop. Murad, 34, who owned two shops in the Iraqi city of Sinjar before Islamic State fighters forced him to take his family and flee, has never seen three-year-old Nishtiman, her brothers Nashwan, 5, and Nashat, 6, or his wife Jinar again. “Sometimes I talk to myself—I literally talk to myself—and say ‘maybe, just maybe, they are still alive,'" he says, "then I say to myself immediately after that, ‘but the sea was very difficult, they did not have a chance.’” There are many obstacles standing between Murad, who was resettled in #Germany, and the truth: chaotic record-keeping in countries where bodies wash up on beaches; an apathetic public; far-right governments with no interest in the plight of

Occupying more than a million square feet on the north bank of the River Thames in #London, the Palace of Westminster has been the seat of the British government since 1016, though the majority of today’s Palace dates to the Victorian era. It has more than 1,100 rooms, including both chambers of Parliament, lawmakers’ offices, committee rooms, libraries and pubs. In one form or another it has survived political crises, terrorist attacks and two major fires. But take a trip through its humid, cramped basement, and its decrepit state is obvious, reports Billy Perrigo. Its facade looks ornate from a distance, but up close it’s held together only by the grime of decades. In the basement, Victorian-era pipes carry pressurized steam just inches away from high voltage electric cables. The alarm system is so unreliable that at least two wardens look for fires, day and night, all year round. In May, in the wake of the blaze at Paris' Notre Dame cathedral, U.K. lawmakers voted to set up an independent body to totally evacuate and refurbish Parliament. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @ben_quinton for TIME
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Occupying more than a million square feet on the north bank of the River Thames in #London, the Palace of Westminster has been the seat of the British government since 1016, though the majority of today’s Palace dates to the Victorian era. It has more than 1,100 rooms, including both chambers of Parliament, lawmakers’ offices, committee rooms, libraries and pubs. In one form or another it has survived political crises, terrorist attacks and two major fires. But take a trip through its humid, cramped basement, and its decrepit state is obvious, reports Billy Perrigo. Its facade looks ornate from a distance, but up close it’s held together only by the grime of decades. In the basement, Victorian-era pipes carry pressurized steam just inches away from high voltage electric cables. The alarm system is so unreliable that at least two wardens look for fires, day and night, all year round. In May, in the wake of the blaze at Paris' Notre Dame cathedral, U.K. lawmakers voted to set up

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